PhotosCafe TalkAbout this site

Home


Obsessions
Espresso
Other
Archived
Coffee
Drip Coffee
Grinder Redux
Press Pots
Coffee Resource
Vacuum Brewers







The CoffeeKid Bookstore
in association with Amazon.com
All contents are 1998-2002 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved. Please do not borrow, take or steal anything without permission.

Check out CoffeeGeek! or my personal site, Spiffle, or my company, WebMotif Net Services.
Drip Coffee
Home >> Coffee >> Drip Coffee
Hario Manual Cloth Drip

Drip coffee. Filter drip, manual drip, auto drip, anything that uses gravity and a filter to make coffee. A lot of coffee snobs eschew filter drip coffee, and I'm probably just as guilty as the rest of fostering the idea that filter drip equals low quality. I've also fostered the idea that filter drip is no where near as exciting or "sexy" as espresso is. I hope I can change that perception, if only just a bit.

More stuff to come. Maybe this will have subsection pages, maybe it won't.


CoffeeKid Home Page

SideBar

Amongst all the filter drip brewers I own, a few stand out as my favourites.

Hario Manual Drip Maker - this beaut (the brewer seen in the identifying image icon for this page) is a great little brewer, using a cloth muslin filter bag to separate grounds from your brewed beverage. It is a bit of a pain to clean, but does it ever produce a full yet mellow and smooth coffee.

Melitta Manual Drip - Melitta sells a wide range of manual drip coffee makers, and they like to push them as "gourmet" models. There's a reason - the water is hot enough. Melitta's new "flavorpore" filter papers actually seem to work, letting more of the coffee oils pass through.

Chemex Manual Drip - yes, another manual brewer. The Chemex model looks like a chemistry experiment, because in a way it is - it is modeled after chem beakers. The special paper is what makes this coffee great.

KitchenAid Four Cup Auto - there aren't many automatic filter drip coffee makers I like - reason is, most tend to brew too cold, as much as 15 or 20 F below optimum. The little four cup KitchenAid model features two heating elements, one for the water, one for the hotplate, and that seems to make all the difference - it brews above 192F, which is great.